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20100101
20100131
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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
government as well. guest: years ago when he met with hamid karzai at a dinner, someone said to him, mr. president, how are you going to address this problem of corruption? in fact, he said, what problem? joe biden, famously -- dinner was over -- he threw his napkin down and said, this dinner is over, and walked out. nothing has happened to defrost his relations with president karzai. both biden and richard holbrooke have terrible relations with karzai. host: james traub is with us to talk about the influence of joe biden. republicans, 202-737-0001. democrats, 202-737-0002. independents, 202-628-0205. you can send us an e-mail or tweet us at. next phone call. caller: i think our president is doing very well. if we wanted joe biden as president, he would be president. i like the idea that our president is intelligent. he is not a puppet, like the last eight years. i think he is doing what he is supposed to be doing. host: james traub? guest: i guess i would agree, in general. he believes he could be a good president. i believe this is almost a desirable alternative. he is a very knowledg
't have to continue. khzaei -- karzai was a great hope. everyone no knows him respected him. he might change his mind. the pressures that led him to permit and maybe support this corrupt structure could be reversed over time. the people up and down that structure might change their mind. the parliament is -- has stood up against his nominations. who's knows who's going to happen up and down that road. if we succeed in something that we can do, peter has pointed out the crucial important to the kandahar road. than doesn't be impossible to secure that. that changes the economic nature of southern afghanistan. it could get better. >> if i could just add one point. there's no question that the ghost of vietnam haunts this administration. i can tell you from being in it for 60 days. the ghost of what happened to lyndon johnson walks the corridors of this white house, it walks the corridors of this building every day. it's a mistake. we got to get over it. we got to stop fighting the vietnam war. i don't know whether we could have won or not, but it is not relevant to afghanistan. as marc p
. the book centers on this incident which i described where u.s. special operators blocked hamid karzai's planned governor for kabul. she interweaves into it a very well-written and interestingly a history that is well-written, well-organized, and based on a lot of her own research with the original sources. a second really important understanding of the country can be gotten from joe haversty's book "the opium season" which details a year in which he was involved in as a subcontractor in the usaid efforts in 2 004-2005 to provide alternative livelihood's to draw with the work force from up opium production. it gives a great view of the violence and corruption. and moreover it shows the bureaucratic profiteering and dysfunction that is increasing the complexity and cost of our involvement, not just in war, but in development. a third source, and i think it is outstanding if you want to understand the country is rory stewart, who within weeks after the fall of the taliban walked to kabul in the winter which is supposed to kill you and through pashtun villages and described that experienc
karzai and with his cabinet on numerous occasions, notably with the trip that hillary clinton and i had made to afghanistan on october 18 and 19 in conjunction with the inauguration. the afghans understood this, they are very comfortable with it. so i need to underscore that's what july 2011 means. not a withdraw, but the start of a responsibility transition in which american combat troops will begin to draw down. on the second question and in regard to pakistan, i'm not sure quite how you phrase it. strobe, you made a generic comment? >> mike hamlin and his colleagues have put together a set of bench marks on sort of how things are going. and the trend that they feel they have identified in pakistan is ominous, negative by comparison with a year ago. >> yeah. i read mike's monthly, it's quarterly, actually, isn't it? i read mike's quarterly table with great interest. and it@@@@@@p it's a common problem i've seen in every war i've been involved in. let's not confuse the number of cell phones with low the war is going. let's not minimize that cell phone penetration is a hugely important
. >>> the afghan parliament has overwhelmingly rejected the new cabinet of president hamid karzai. 17 of 24 nominations were rejected by afghan lawmakers. the vote is a serious setback for karzai, coming on the heels of his controversial re-election as president. >>> somehow, some way, a suicide bomber managed to slip onto a u.s. base in afghanistan without being searched, killing seven cia officers. now a terror group is taking credit for wednesday's attack, praising a possible double agent. cnn's atea bowie is in kabul with the very latest. >> reporter: the question that remains is just how a suicide bomber was able to make it onto an american base in eastern afghanistan, detonate his vest and kill seven cia agents. american officials here in afghanistan still are not talking about just how he was able to do that. the taliban claiming that he was actually an afghan soldier, a soldier that they were able to convince to switch allegiances rather than fighting with the u.s. forces, fighting against the u.s. forces. and the taliban claimed that they will continue to infiltrate the afghan army
with taliban fighters. president hamid karzai said he wants to let militants lay down their weapons and go home, so long as they are not affiliated with al qaeda. karzai spoke in istanbul, turkey, three days before an international conference on afghanistan in london. he said gathering international support was key. >> in the past, this effort by the afghan government did not have the backing or the support of our international partners. this current effort, this renewed effort, i should say, has the backing of our partners, in particular the united states and europe. >> sreenivasan: at the same time, the nato commander in afghanistan said he hopes an influx of troops will force taliban leaders to accept peace. general stanley mcchrystal suggested former taliban could even join the government. he said, "i think any afghans can play a role if they focus on the future, and not the past." also today, nato officials announced two more soldiers-- one british, one norwegian-- have been killed in bombings in afghanistan. the u.s. military will speed up a review of more than 4,300 iraq and afghanistan
described where u.s. special operators blocked karzai's planned governor for kabul but she interweaves into it a very well written and interestingly -- history that is well written and well organized and -- and based on a lett of her own research with the original sources, a second reading -- rell important understanding of the country can be gotten from joel's book the opium season. and that details a year in which he was involved in a -- as a -- subcontractor in u.s. a.i.d. efforts in 2004 and 2005 to provide alternative livelihoods, to -- to draw away the work force from opium production. and it gives a great view of the violence and corruption and this complex tribal and world relations. and moreover, it shows the bureaucratic prove fit tiering and dysfunction that -- is -- is increasing the complexity and cost of our involvement, not just in war but in -- in development. a third source and it is outstanding if you want to understand the country is roshy stewart, wo within weeks after the fall of the taliban walked from iraq to kabul in the winter, which is supposed to kill you. an
on afghanistan reveals how difficult it will be for president hamid karzai to make good on his promise to crack down on rampant corruption in that country. the u.n. office on drugs and crime says $2.5 billion in bribes were paid to public officials over the past 12 months. those bribes added up to almost a quarter of afghanistan's gross domestic product. one person in two in afghanistan had to pay at least one kickback in the last year. >>> corruption, you may recall, is also a big issue in china. today a former judge on china's highest court was sentenced to life in prison for accepting almost $600,000 in bribes. but he's hardly alone. china's official anti-corruption commission said that 106,000 officials were found guilty of corruption last year. last week, the office of the top prosecutor said 4,000 chinese officials had fled the country with a total of $50 billion in stolen cash over the last three decades. which takes to us this question. as chinese technology helps power that country toward surpassing japan as the world's second largest economy after the u.s., is china stealing to get th
nominees for president karzai's cabinet. one of them was the only female nominee. what does this say about the is stability of afghanistan? >> reporter: it could say two things right now. it could say one, that the afghan government were not obviously happy with president karzai's choices. many parliamentarians have said he basically chose people who helped him during the campaign that he made promises to so he could get the presidency again. another way of looking at this, it's democracy in action. here you have the parliament who are turning down president karzai's choices. we should mention two weeks earlier when i asked the president at a press conference why he didn't have more female choices, he had only had one in his list, he conceded that he knew the parliament would reject a lot of his choices and he told me he expects to have more and more females within this cabinet and women throughout the government. >> brooke. >> an tillal, thank you. >>> we will take an inside look at what is being called the world's newest, tallest building. first though, our random moment in 90 seconds. >
. that's the same message we saw and heard in afghanistan with hamid karzai. these reluctant leaders that we, the united states, need. >> that's exactly right, tamron. we'll find the focus shifting from afghanistan to other potential sanctuaries, and in all of these cases we're dealing with teetering or failed states, weak governments, imperfect allies. but we have to work with them and find a way to partner with these imperfect friends and find a way to root out al qaeda within their countries, be much more aggressive with intelligence operations, because we're not going to be able to apply military forces to these places. >> i want to take that point directly to jim at the pentagon. jim, on that point as far as yemen, how much does our military, does our government, how much can we trust the yemeni government? >> there's not a whole lot of trust of the the ability of the yemen government, you know, they do feel at this point that the yemen government is sincere in trying to take down, or at least diminish the effectiveness of al qaeda in yemen itself. it's also dealing with a civil
while karzai had to survive while he was being neglected, he is a pashtun. however, he is a peaceful one. his father was a parliamentarian. he himself is not pocketing money, or whatever. host: we're going to let it go there and let john newman reply. guest: i know we are short on time. it is crucial and my son talked to me about all the time how important it is, and the soldiers know that, to treat the local population while group a lot of their medics were training kids from the -- were treating kids from the village who were being hurt by the mortars from the taliban who could not shoot them very well. and we are expanding considerably the civilian effort t. host: how does that compare with vietnam? guest: we suffered in the early years of the war for not having paid attention to that. host: jon newman teaches courses in soviet, chinese, and east asian history. this is his book. you can try to track and online. thanks for being with us this morning. that will about do it for washed -- for "washington journal" this morning. we will be back at 7:00 a.m. eastern tomorro
working together so well recently. >> rose: do you have great confidence in the karzai government that they will be a partner this snefrt i think we cannot look only toll the national government of afghanistan. this is a young government. they've got deep systemic flaws they are burdened with corruption but it is a struggling democracy. but we need to lo beyond that at a village level. this is all about politics and as the late tip o'neill said, all politics is local. it's certainly case in counterterrorism, counterinsurgency. and i thin that's the way we must approach it. it's not just capital to capital nation to nation. this is a fight about the people and for the people. >> rose: turn your attention to al qaeda and how they see the world. and where do they get their momentum and where do they get their strength and where do they get their opportunity. >> there are many theories and my guess-- and that's all it is sds that it may well be about globalization and the growth of free market societies, the growth of liberal institutions around the world. and if you look at in in tho
for reforming washington. >> is there a way that can be accomplished? >> president karzai is heading to london this week and he wants some taliban taken off the u.s. sanctions welist in exchange for their laying down their arms. >> you have heard that general petraeus discussed similar type efforts in afghanistan, political reconciliations. you have per general mcchrystal discussed the same thing. obviously, that is a similar path to what happened in iraq. each of those two individuals have talked through this. this is provided that whoever this is accept the event constitution, renounces violence, and publicly breaks through the groups that advocate violence. that is what people expect under the notion of reconciliation. >> last week, the win put out a report saying that the amount of graft and kickbacks in of denniston is about $2.3 billion per year which is 25% of their gross domestic product. who in the administration is really writing point on dealing with issues of corruption in afghanistan? >> a group of people working and our afghan policy -- let me figure out where some of that inform
blocked karzai's plan to governor for kabul. she interweaves a very well- written and interestingly a history that is a well-written, well-organized and based on her own research with original sources. a second really important understanding of the country can be gotten from the book "the opium season," which details a year in which he was involved as a -- a subcontractor in u.s.a.i.d. efforts in 2004-2005 to provide alternative livelihood's to draw with a workforce from opium production. it gives a view of the violence, tribal and warlord relations, and moreover, it shows the bureaucratic profiteering and dysfunction that is increasing the complexity and cost of our involvement, not just in war, but in development. a third source, and i think it is outstanding if you want to understand the country is stored, who within weeks after the fall of the taliban locked to kabul in the winter, which is supposed to kill you -- what to kabul in the winter, which is supposed to value and described the bill which experience in a week -- and described that experience in a way in which any develo
counts of first degree murder. afghanistan's parliament is rejecting 17 of president hamid karzai's 24 cabinet nominees and says that he has to make new selections. the head of the u.n. mission in afghanistan is calling the ruling a setback that will delay efforts to get a functioning government up and running. officials say karzai will now have to spend political energy nominating new choices when the country should be focused on needed reform. >> didn't take them because they're corrupt. >> really. >> this is' heavy snow falling in salem, massachusetts and some strong winds, let's get a check on all of this from rick reichmuth in the weather center. >> the northeast has been pummelled with more wind and snow and that area of low pressure, the downer clock-wise circulation has gotten so wound up. warm air across the north side of that. bangor maine, 36 degrees. burlington vermont, 10 degrees. cold air across the eastern two-thirds of the country. if you want warm temps go far out towards the west and the satellite radar picture for us is going to be continuing to show a little bit of
. look at afghanistan with karzai, sure we support the united states, you are not going against supporting the united states. but back room deal. >> yemen is trying to get rid . >> president obama sanctioned the air strike specifically against alaki who is the iman who is tied to the fort hood shooter and abdullmuttallab . he managed to survive the air strike before christmas. >> and the president wrapped up counter terrorism against yemen and spent 67 million last year alone. five million in 2006 . it is ramped up the president is serious about that and airport security. we are finding out that the pat downs, one of the second screening efforts are effectism. you have an underwear bomber, how in the world is a pat down going to catch something. >> how is it that they are doing it? >> it wouldn't matter in i demonstrate you. >> do i have to do this? >> you cannot board the plane. >> this is all they do. they do the side touching and quick side touch that's it. >> that's it. >> and if the underwear bomber had stuff hidden where -- >> you're dangerous. the point is they are so pol
karzai's presence because he was so disgusted by the corruption there. and gere toi and we're going to build an army out of that? >> and we have an extensively western base allied to us. but we all know, this is a tribal-based country. the british came and went. the russians came and went. to me, it's just a mystery what we're trying to really do. >> elisabeth bumiller, thank you very much. a great article. >> thanks. thanks. >> it's a frustrating situation and a frustrating country. >> it is. and also, we deal with our own security and how we shore that up. because even all these years later, we find ourselves almost as at risk after 9/11. >> i want someone to commission a poll on body studies. i bet you have 95% of the americans saying, go ahead, we don't care. >>> coming up next, "all things at once," it is not a book so much as it is a way of life. we're going to preview mika's book. it's going to change not only your life, but i would guess america. we'll be right back. ( whistling ) ( sniffing ) missing something? now at sears optical, get 2 pairs of glasses for $99.99. or tak
will keep a focus on this -- >> i hope you're speaking for yourself. >> you did a great job with karzai and i'll say that again. [laughter] >> the fact is that this is an opportunity for us, i think, to continue to put pressure -- to make sure that more draconian steps are taken instead of willy-nilly kind of things that yielded the same kinds of results and i thank you for your testimony. >> i couldn't agree with you, senator. we'll come to that point after senator shaheen. but i don't agree with you at all. i think this is a moment and i think it's going to take the tough hand of leadership. senator shaheen? >> i notice the bell hadn't gone off but we're not drifting around here. we can have a second round. >> i prefer to think of it as an opportunity to finish my questions. i want to thank each one of you for being here and for your insights into this horrific human tragedy. i share my colleagues gratification and the outpouring from not only the united states but from the rest of the world to try and respond to this tragedy. and i guess my first question before i ask more about the
is the evidentry bar for that. is that smart to target drug dealers because karzai's brother is purporpted to be on the drug trade. is he on the target list? if not, what distinguishes him from one of the dealers who is? so a lot of interesting questions are posed and i think it's right to wonder why a program of assassination conducted in their name, people who don't feel like they have the right to find out about that. host: where did you get your information from? guest: various places. a lot from reporting done by other media. everything has been written about this as well as talking to intelligence, present and former senior intelligence officers. the ranking member of the intelligence committee, he got on our national security blog and commented on this. we put the question up, what do you know about this program? so various sources. think tank people, counter terrorism experts, both here and overseas. host: what was the reaction when you asked the question about the program and trying to learn more about it? guest: i think a lot of people thought it's a good idea to -- i'll tell you
be accomplished? >> yes. yes, sir. >> president karzai is headed to the afghan conference in london this week, and he is saying that he is when asked for that names of some taliban people to be taken off the u.n. sanctions list in return for them laying down their arms and countenancing talks. is this something the white house would be prepared to look at? >> i would simply say that you have heard general petreaus, added his efforts in iraq, discuss similar type efforts in afghanistan at political reconciliation. you have heard general mcchrystal discuss the same thing. so obviously a similar path to what happened in a rack each of those two individuals have talked through. again, provided that whoever this is accepts the afghan constitution, renounces violence, and publicly breaks with groups that advocate violence. that is what people except -- expect under the notion of reconciliation. >> first on afghanistan as well. last week the u.n. put out a report saying that the amount of graft and kickbacks in afghanistan is about $2.3 billion a year, about 25% of their gross domestic product. who
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)